THE BRITISH CERAMICS BIENNIAL 2017: CR’s HIGHLIGHTS

The British Ceramics Biennial is back: the UK’s largest festival to celebrate, showcase and support contemporary ceramics in all their diversity. For its fifth edition, BCB is returning to the ceramic city of Stoke-on-Trent.  To get you in the mood, we’ve lined up some festival highlights – here are some of our top picks:

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A former Spode Factory worker painting china for Neil Brownsword’s performative work, Places and Practices, which takes place in the former Spode factory. 2017. Photo Joel FildesPhoto Joel Fildes

Neil Brownsword: Place and Practice

A former Spode Factory worker painting china with a tissue transfer process, part of Neil Brownsword’s performative work, Places and Practices, which takes place in the former Spode factory. The Stoke-on-Trent-born artist’s installations explore the social and political histories of craft labour, and re-activate the former factory site.

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FRESH 2017, British Ceramics Biennial 2017, photo Joel FildesPhoto Joel Fildes

FRESH 

BCB’s flagship exhibition FRESH, along with AWARD, offer a platform for both established and emerging ceramic artists, aiming to provide a snapshot of the latest work being made in the UK. Pictured above: sculpture by Eusebio Sanchez.

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Katie Spragg, The Glasshouse, 2017, 2017, photo Joel Fildes Photo Joel Fildes

AWARD

The Johnson Tiles-sponsored exhibition AWARD features ceramics by 10 shortlisted artists, including Eva Masterman, Matt Smith and Zoe Lloyd. Pictured above: a detail from Katie Spragg‘s The Glasshouse – a specially commissioned work based on the plants growing in the factory, Spode’s history of botanical design and the architecture of the industrial building.

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Ian McIntyre, Brown Betty Teapot. Photo thebrownbettyteapot.com/Photo via The Brown Betty

Brown Betty: The Archetypal Teapot

Once made in its millions for over 300 years, the iconic Brown Betty teapot is still produced in Stoke from the original Etruria Marl red clay. Designer Ian McIntyre has now re-engineered the classic design to bring it in line with contemporary taste, and ‘progress the best of the DNA from the original to lift this overlooked icon into the 21st century.’ Pictured above: Ian McIntyre’s re-launched Brown Betty.

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BCB CERAMIC REVIEW 287 2017

 

Can’t make it to Stoke? You can read more about BCB inside the latest issue of Ceramic Review (CR 287), available here, in which the festival’s Artistic Director Barney Hare-Duke looks back on BCB’s success and explores his highlight’s of this year’s programme. Check our CR’s Instagram for a takeover by a BCB artist every Monday until 2 October.

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The British Ceramics Biennial takes place in Stoke-onTrent from 23 September to 5 November 2017. Find out more about the BCB here.

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