Fresh talent: the Carter Preston Prize shortlist

The shortlist for the Bluecoat Display Centre‘s inaugural Carter Preston Prize was recently announced.
Below we share the work of three emerging makers whose ceramics were singled out by its judges

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Lanty Ball, carved parian vessels. Photo copyright the artist

Lanty Ball, carved parian vessels – photo copyright the artist

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Lanty Ball

‘I make minimal thrown or slip-cast vessels that act as canvases for my surface finishes. At the moment these include carved and incised linear designs.’

I’ve been asked to exhibit six of my carved white parian vessels within the Carter Preston Prize exhibition. Parian is a type of porcelain that was developed in the 19th century to imitate the qualities of marble. The external surfaces of my vessels are incised with parallel lines, using a technique that fractures the clay. This creates a texture that is reminiscent of fragmented patterns found in eroded rock faces. Every piece is unique, not just because it is hand-carved, but also because the underlying form of each vessel constrains the flow of the incised lines. Over the past year I’ve been working on the technical problems associated with producing larger pieces in parian. I’ll be showing some of these larger pieces in the exhibition in Liverpool. I’m also developing another collection of thrown porcelain vessels with water-eroded surfaces.

lantyball.com

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Jane King, absence series - photo Bernard G. Mills

Jane King, absence series – photo Bernard G. Mills

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Jane King

‘I create small ceramic sculptures which are intended to have physical, formal and visual intensity and energy, through the use of contrasting extremes of form, colour and texture.’

‘It’s fantastic that there’s a new prize for ceramic artists in that post-training, emerging artist state. In the work I’ll be exhibiting you’ll find me continuing to explore ideas about personal identity and the need I often feel to project to others a sense of control and order which might belie what is really happening in my life. I observe this tendency to contain and control personal chaos and mess everywhere around me; it seems prevalent in contemporary life as we strive for the perfect career, relationship, appearance…
My sculptures address these ideas through combinations of physical opposites which are metaphors for the messiness of real experience alongside a more constructed, controlled identity. I hope my pieces are interesting but unsettling to look at.  I’m showing six recent pieces in Liverpool, including a brand new one which hasn’t been exhibited before.’

janekingceramics.com

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Jo Taylor, 'Bounteous i' - photo John Taylor

Jo Taylor, ‘Bounteous i’ – photo John Taylor

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Jo Taylor

‘I make ceramic sculpture, inspired by decorative ornament such as plaster ceilings. I combine forms using the wheel and hand building techniques to create each unique piece.’

‘I really wanted to show my work in Liverpool – my Mum and half my family are from there, so it’s a significant and important place for me to bring my work. I hadn’t heard of Julia Carter Preston and when I learnt about her contribution to ceramics and education I felt she was an important and inspiring woman, so it would be a great show to be part of. What excited me was the idea that I might make something special for the show inspired by the architecture of Liverpool. On a recent trip I took lots of photographs, with the help of my cousins, visiting places like the Philharmonic pub which has a famous interior full of beautiful tiles, mosaic floors and stained glass. My favourite inspirational building is the Palm House in Sefton Park, which I’ve visited nearly every year of my life. I have seen it in all conditions – from thriving in the ’70s  to its demise and sad dereliction in the ’80s. It’s now beautifully restored, and the structure and decorative elements have given me a number of ideas I will start putting into clay form soon.’

jotaylorceramics.com

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The winner of the Carter Preston Prize will be announced on 8 July. Read about Julia Carter Preston and discover more about the prize and its shortlist here.

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