One for the weekend: Ceramic Art York 2016

With Ceramic Art York around the corner, CR shares its top five makers to watch at the major selling fair

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Screen Shot 2016-09-05 at 09.03.59

Joan Hardie

‘3D printing presents the possibility of building three-dimensional forms in any material that can be made to flow out of a nozzle’

Joan and her husband Jack have been making pots for over forty years, and 3D printed ceramics is their latest exploration. Inspired by natural forms with a sense of life and movement, these pots are created using methods that mean that ‘achieving the right consistency of clay is an art in itself’, demanding innovative approaches to glazing and firing to ‘make the forms come alive’. Meet the makers and learn more this weekend.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Screen Shot 2016-09-05 at 09.05.56

Andy Priestman

‘I strive for a carefully made pot that is good to hold and use, with glazes and slips of rich depth and complexity’

Based in Minniwick, south west Scotland, Andy Priestman works with ball clays from Dorset and Devon, combined with local low-firing clays and Ayrshire fireclays, to produce his graceful pottery. He draws inspiration from glazes ‘developed in the early days of high-fired ceramics in China, Korea and Japan,’ and is also a painter, working on pieces influenced by the ancient woods and forests of the Galloway Hills.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Screen Shot 2016-09-05 at 09.01.36

Haruhiko Kaneko

‘I live on an island which enfolds me in its magnificent ocean panorama of marine blues and emerald greens, shimmering under the golden light of the sun’

Only a handful of potters use the yuteki tenmoku technique in ceramics today, and Haruhiko Kaneko is one of them, thanks to his father, Kyo-u. From his studio on the island of Ishigaki, Japan, Haruhiko makes glittering black and blue vessels along with cutting-edge ceramic installations. He established his studio in 1999, making work with the wish that his pieces ‘should depart from Ishigaki, travelling all over the world, passing into the hands of gallery owners and collectors, and bringing joy to all who look upon them.’

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Screen Shot 2016-09-05 at 09.05.09

Ben Davies

‘I make pots in which surface relief and undulations are incorporated as a result of the building process’

Growing up in York, potter Ben Davies started making pots at the age of 14, inspired by a teacher at school. Today he is based in Hackney, east London, making striking coiled pots using a combination of clays, layering slips and techniques to produce dramatic surface effects. Ben is particularly influenced by beach stones and geological strata in his work, which is unglazed and, when smoke-fired, burnished before being polished with wax.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Morten Image 2

Jenny Morten

‘My lifelong journey has been to investigate how to create work which demonstrates the power of the natural forces I have witnessed’

Jenny Morten’s ceramics draw on her experiences of the coastal geology and marine fossils of North Yorkshire – her childhood home – along with the cliffs, stacks and coves of Cornwall. Having lived in the USA for several years, Jenny now works from her studio in Bridlington, making pieces that possess ‘balance, fragility and multi-layered surfaces’, acting as ‘a metaphor for the precarious nature of our own existence’.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Find work by over forty top studio ceramists at Ceramic Art York this weekend (9–11 Sept), based in York Museum Gardens, next to York Art Gallery. See the fair’s full list of exhibitors and programme of talks and demonstrations at ceramicartyork.org

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………